It's truly winter in Iowa, and with it, all the fun driving conditions. In fact, earlier this morning a semi trailer jack-knifed to shut down both lanes of 218 outside of Janesville.

Credit: KWWL
Credit: KWWL
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As always it's important to be prepared for large storms; especially if you plan on driving. Here are some helpful tips in the form of infographs courtesy of the National Weather Service & NOAA.

Credit: National Weather Service
Credit: National Weather Service
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Credit: National Weather Service
Credit: National Weather Service
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And according to our weather partners at KWWL, this could be a continuing trend as snow falls through the weekend. Starting now with light scattered snow showers that will add up to an inch. Highs will top out in the 30s, so refreezing and icy conditions are with us to stay. In addition, there will be northwest winds at around 10 to 15 mph. This wind will cause some blowing and drifting, especially on rural roadways. Through the overnight hours you can expect those snow showers come to an end, but winds will continue at around 10 to 20 mph, with gusts that could reach 25.

Credit: KWWL
Credit: KWWL
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Temperatures will gradually drop off into the teens and low 20s by daybreak Thursday. 

Credit: KWWL
Credit: KWWL
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Thursday continues with northwest winds and then back in to overnight snow. On Friday the light snow showers will continue through the morning with snow totals to stay less than an inch.

And here's where the real fun begins...

Heavy snowfall on a country road. Driving on it becomes dangerous â¦
Credit: trendobjects
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Saturday's outside weather conditions can be stated bluntly; not for the living. Highs will tumble into the teens and single digits, lows drop into the single digits to below zero. And then the snow will pick back up. And according to KWWL, this winter storm happens to have the highest snow fall potential of any system we see through the week.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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